Skin conditions

Atopic DermatitisFungal Infections
Dermatitis:

Inflammation of the skin by irritating or allergenic substances (typically soaps, certain fabrics, plants, etc) or clinical conditions such as eczema or psoriasis. Dermatitis often results in redness, itching, local swelling, and lesions.

Treatment Options:

neo-salus-skin-condition

Eczema:

A chronic, itchy, relapsing rash that develops on the flexure regions of the body (inside of elbow, behind the knees, etc) throughout the lifespan and on the head and neck in adults. It usually starts during childhood but may begin during early adulthood. The cause is unknown, although a link with abnormal immune function has been suggested.

Treatment Options:

neo-salus-skin-condition

Psoriasis:
A chronic recurring inflammatory disease of the skin, scalp, and joints characterized by pruritic erythematous lesions appearing as well-circumscribed, dry, scaling patches covered by grayish, silvery, lamellar scales and varying in size and shape. Both genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the pathophysiology of this disease.

Treatment Options:

neo-salus-skin-condition

Rough skin:

Skin may take on a rough appearance in the presence of surface lesions, such as those associated with psoriasis, keratosis and dry skin.

Treatment Options:

neo-salus-skin-condition

Xerosis:

Abnormally dry, scaly, itchy, erythematous skin seen mainly on the legs and arms. It is common among the elderly and tends to worsen in winter. Severe cases can lead to xerotic eczema or eczema craquele (severe form of eczema characterized by fissured, cracked, and extremely itchy skin), which may affect the patient’s quality of life.

Treatment Options:

neo-salus-skin-condition

Tinea Versicolor:
Chronic infection of the skin by the fungus Malassezia furfur (previously known as Pityrosporum versicolor) characterized by oval, hyper- or hypopigmented pruritic lesions covered with fine scales that appear mainly on the upper portion of the neck, arms, and trunk. In children, they also commonly appear on the face.
Seborrheic dermatitis:
A common relapsing inflammation of skin characterized by poorly defined, scaling, erythematous lesions in areas with a high concentration of sebaceous glands, such as the face, upper chest, back, and especially the scalp.

References:

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